Why another new Civil War blog?

31 01 2008

Starting yet another blog on the Civil War was never high on my list of things to do. But I decided to do this after the experience I had posting on Brett Schulte’s TOCWOC.  Even though there are a large number of people on that blog not much seems to be getting done. After writing the last two new posts myself, I decided this was something I could do on my own, although if Brett keeps the site up, I will occasionally cross-post things there.

So, what kind of blog did I want to do? I’ve never been strong on military matters where the war is concerned, so to try that would be an exercise in futility. After some lengthy thought, I decided I would blog on subjects that interest me, hence the name “One Man’s Rebellion Record”. I know “rebellion” is a red flag to some people, but it has always fit my view of the Civil War. The South rebelled against the ideals of the federal government and sought to create their own country, where their institutions would be safe from northern oversight. They lost, and that has brought us the world we have today.

Much of what I write here will focus on my current research interest, namely the life of Everton J. Conger, the government detective in charge of the troops that captured John Wilkes Booth. While there are some sites that deal with Lincoln’s assassination, I imagine about 60 percent of what I write will focus on that topic.

But I will also discuss various social and political aspects of the era, which I feel gets short shrift on most blogs simply because most bloggers like the military aspects of the war. In addition, I will talk about books that interest me, although I doubt I will do much in the way of in-depth reviews.

One thing I plan to do which I haven’t seen on any other blog is to discuss some of the older Civil War and Lincoln books that remain classics and why I think they continue to merit a look. I also will from time to time talk about past historians and how their work has influenced me. Most of those will be about historians no longer living, but not always.

I don’t approach this with any ax to grind, nor do I seek controversy just for its own sake. But I will not shy away from discussing things that are controversial. I might even discuss current events from time to time, but 95 percent of what I plan to write about will focus on what has been called “the middle period”.

Hope you enjoy it.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

8 responses

1 02 2008
Don

Rob,

Welcome to the blogosphere! Or I suppose welcome back. I’ve enjoyed your TOCWOC posts, so am looking forward to seeing great things here.

Don

3 02 2008
Rob Wick

Don,

Thanks for the words of encouragement. Hopefully you won’t be disappointed.

Best
Rob

19 02 2008
Kurt Cruppenink

The discussion of older civil war or Lincoln authors and their works is a very useful project I believe. When I began my fascination with Lincoln I found a work that included a list of “the top 100 Lincoln books”. I photocopied this list and began my assault on Lincoln literature in this manner. If I’m not mistaken this may have been in a Randall work. Since the literature is so vast and overwhelming, I’ve always enjoyed using other people’s suggestions as to works deserving of my precious time as well as using the bibliographies found in those works I enjoyed and were recommended by the author. I trust that I will find this to be another one of those useful sources for future reading tips. Thanks.

19 02 2008
Rob Wick

Kurt,

Appreciate your kind words. One of the reasons I wanted to do this blog is that so many of the new books that are out today build on those earlier works, and while every author does give those pioneers their due, some people might not be aware of how a particular “school” developed. This is as much a learning project for me as for others as well. Look forward to your comments.

Best
Rob

20 02 2008
Randal Berry

Rob,
I hope you touch on Lincolns assassination and various books regarding that subject as well.

That always guarantee’s a lively debate.

As you know, I’m a “buff” and I always have an open mind regarding the assassination. I admire you, Steve Miller, Mr. K, and others and look forward to seeing this subject in the future.

Randal Berry

20 02 2008
Rob Wick

Randal,

I do plan to discuss the assassination soon. When I first decided to do the historians of the past, though, I think I was naive in how much time it would take to do justice to them. This type of forum doesn’t necessarily lend itself to deep analytical discussion. Thanks for commenting.

Best
Rob

20 02 2008
Kurt Cruppenink

I have always found that my personal study of a topic leads me in a direction of ever expanding evolution of interest. Lincoln interest led naturally to civil war “battle” interest which deepened into pre-antebellum political interests, and finally to a deep interest in prominent political figures of the era. I now have built a library containing many volumes on Henry Seward, Gideon Welles, Parson Brownlow, Edwin Stanton, Salmon Chase, James Blaine, Roscoe Conkling, Charles Sumner, Henry Wilson, etc. When you carry this additional knowledge into your civil war reading the depth of what you get out of it is so much richer. Of course one must be careful to not become over influenced by the many volumes written in the 1860’s that were merely self acclaiming exercises of platitudes for the subject with little objectivity such as many of the American Statesmen series.

21 02 2008
Rob Wick

Kurt, you are certainly right about much of the hagiography out there. What really surprises me is how little fresh has been written on many of the members of Lincoln’s cabinet. No biography of Stanton has been written since Benjamin Thomas and Harold Hyman wrote theirs in 1962. William Seward hasn’t had one since the 1980s. Salmon Chase had one written in the 1990s, but that’s the most recent. Something needs to be done about it.

Best
Rob

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: